How to crochet tutorial: front post stitches (for crocheting right-handed)

Front post stitches for crocheting right-handed

In June I’m teaching the How to Crochet Raised Stitches short course. I thought this would be a good time to write a tutorial explaining raised stitches for those of you who can’t join us in person. This tutorial for crocheting right-handed about front post stitches (if you crochet left-handed take a look at this tutorial).

Front post stitches: insert hook under post of next stitch

You may be wondering what raised stitches are, or you may have been asked to work a raised stitch in a pattern but been uncertain how to do so.

Crochet designers write patterns with the assumption that everyone inserts their hook into the top of crochet stitches in the same way. Therefore, if their design needs a different approach, then they will tell you in the pattern instructions. Raised stitches are one example of this. They are formed by inserting the hook between stitches instead of into the top of a stitch. And because you could insert your hook from front to back or back to front, there are two types of raised stitch, known as front post or back post stitches. We’ll start with front post stitches.

Start with something familiar

Start by crocheting a row of about 15 treble crochet stitches (US: double crochet). Then work a turning chain (3 chain) and a couple more treble crochet stitches. Your crochet should look similar to mine in the photo below. You can see the turning chain and first two treble crochets of the second row, each stacked above a treble crochet stitch in the first row.

How to crochet front post stitches

Where is the “post”?

The post of the stitch is the upright part of a stitch. You can see the post of a treble crochet stitch between my thumbs in the photo below.

How to crochet front post stitches

I’ve worked a turning chain and two treble crochet stitches on my second row. The next stitch I’m going to make will be a front post treble crochet. Instead of inserting my hook into the top of the fourth stitch in the row below, I’m going to work around it’s post.

How to crochet front post stitches

I’ll insert my hook, in the gap between the third and fourth stitches, from front to back.

How to crochet front post stitches

Then I’ll insert my hook, in the gap between the fourth and fifth stitches, from back to front.

How to crochet front post stitches

How to work a front post treble crochet

Start the front post treble crochet in the same way as a normal one, that is yarn round hook.

How to crochet front post stitches

Now, insert your hook, in between the third and fourth stitches, from front to back. This is going to look and feel a bit strange!

How to crochet front post stitches

Then, move your hook forward and insert it in between the fourth and fifth stitches, from back to front. This will form a front post stitch because the post of the stitch is now in front of the hook. It looks a little strange, doesn’t it?

How to crochet front post stitches

From now on you’ll be working your treble crochet as normal, however it will feel a bit strange until you get the hang of it.

Grab the yarn with your hook.

How to crochet front post stitches

Pull a loop under the post. This can be a little tricky; you may lose the yarn. Don’t worry, just go back, grab the yarn again, rotate the hook down a little and try again. You’ll have three loops on your hook, which should look a bit more familiar.

How to crochet front post stitches

Grab the yarn with your hook and …

How to crochet front post stitches

… pull it through the first two loops on your hook. Now you have two loops.

How to crochet front post stitches

Grab the yarn with your hook again and …

How to crochet front post stitches

… pull it through the remaining two loops on your hook.

How to crochet front post stitches

Now you have one loop and you have made your first front post treble crochet stitch.

Front post stitches are raised

Work a few normal treble crochet stitches and take a look at your crochet.

How to crochet front post stitches

You should be able to see that the front post treble crochet stitch is raised above the other treble crochet stitches.

How to crochet front post stitches

Back post treble crochet

There is a second type of raised stitch: the back post stitch. I’ll write a tutorial about the back post treble crochet another time. Meanwhile, you can have a go: insert your hook, in between the third and fourth stitches, from back to front, then, move your hook backward and insert it in between the fourth and fifth stitches, from front to back. The post of the stitch is now behind the hook and the stitch is lower than the normal treble crochet stitches.

What can you do with post stitches?

Lots of stitch patterns use front and back post stitches in combination with normal stitches. Here’s some examples:

Basic stitches

You can use post stitches to make mock ribs as well as interesting textures such as the basketweave pattern below.

How to crochet front post stitches: basketweave

Cables

Post stitches are essential for crochet cables.

How to crochet front post stitches: plaited cable

Lacy texture

There’s lots of stitch patterns which combine post stitches and lace.

How to crochet front post stitches: lace and texture

There are so many beautiful stitch patterns that use post stitches. You’ll have fun trying them out!

Want to Learn More?

Take a look at my other tutorials. Choose from:

Tutorials for crocheting right-handed

You crochet right-handed if your right hand is your working hand (regardless of which hand you use to hold the yarn) and you crochet from right to left or anti-clockwise.

Tutorials for crocheting left-handed

You crochet left-handed if your left hand is your working hand (regardless of which hand you use to hold the yarn) and you crochet from left to right or clockwise.

Tutorials for knitting right-handed

You knit right-handed if your right hand is your working hand (regardless of which hand you use to hold the yarn) and you move your stitches your left to right needle as you knit.

Tutorials for knitting left-handed

You knit left-handed if your left hand is your working hand (regardless of which hand you use to hold the yarn) and you move your stitches move from your right to left needle as you knit.

Or maybe you’d like to come to one of my short courses or workshops or book a special personalised one-to-one tutorial.

Raised stitches short course

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